Top Democrats Remain Seated During Standing Ovation

 For Slain SEAL's Widow



They were a disgrace. I watched and heard the whole of this speech and these morons are living proof that their purpose is to disagree with and condemn anything that isn't said by themselves. This detail about Ryan Owens was a very touching moment. It showed that the President cares about people and especially veterans. What was equally disgraceful was an ex Democrat Governor of KY who came on after the meeting to condemn President Trump's speech. All this guy proved was that he either hadn't heard a word that Trump said, or chose not to. Of course, as is usual, now being part of the losing side, he had all the answers and was full of how wonderful Obamacare was. Like all parties in opposition, he had all the answers even though there has been a Democrat President in office for the past 8 years. It reminds me of the Labour Party here in Britain, only immediately after their election defeat do they have all the answers that they weren't able to implement in the previous 13 years that they were in office.


Obama was happy for veterans to return to the USA, often with nowhere to go, living on the streets with nothing more than food stamps. That's the thanks he gave them for putting their lives on the line for their country and their fellow Americans.


This is what President Trump said, as the widow of Ryan Owens was shown on camera, unable to contain her emotions:

"We are blessed to be joined tonight by Carryn Owens, the widow of a U.S. Navy special operator, Senior Chief William 'Ryan' Owens. Ryan died as he lived: a warrior, and a hero battling against terrorism and securing our nation. I just spoke to General Mattis, who reconfirmed that, and I quote:

'Ryan was a part of a highly successful raid that generated large amounts of vital intelligence that will lead to many more victories in the future against our enemies. Ryan’s legacy is etched into eternity. For as the Bible teaches us, there is no greater act of love than to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. Ryan laid down his life for his friends, for his country and for our freedom…we will never forget him.'"


As Donald Trump said the words: ".....we will never forget him," I could see in his eyes that he was speaking the truth. Most politicians wouldn't even remember Owens' name an hour after the speech, but I believe Trump will.


The room erupted in applause, lasting over two minutes. Nevertheless, some Democrats - including Keith Ellison and Debbie Wasserman Schultz - remained seated through a large portion of the applause.


Finally however, I did notice that as the speech progressed, almost everyone in the room was giving a standing ovation, so no matter what the anti-Trump prejudices were, they must have found something in the speech that was worthy. How about, "Thank you, God bless you and God bless the United States"?


The man clearly loves his country; what's wrong with that? I wish we had him running the UK. Brexit would have been done and dusted by now instead of all the messing around that goes on daily with this debacle.



The speech in full:



Mr. Speaker, the President of the United States.

(APPLAUSE)

(CHEERS)

DONALD TRUMP


Thank you very much.

PAUL RYAN


Members of Congress, I have the high privilege and the distinct honor of presenting to you the President of the United States.

(APPLAUSE)

DONALD TRUMP


Thank you very much. Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, members of Congress, the first lady of the United States.

(APPLAUSE)

And citizens of America, tonight, as we mark the conclusion of our celebration of black history month, we are reminded of our nation's path toward civil rights and the work that still remains to be done. Recent threats —

President Trump began his speech with a nod to the civil rights movement and Black History Month, using markedly different rhetoric from his campaign. In the months leading up to the election, Trump began asking the rhetorical question to black voters — in front of overwhelmingly white audiences — “What the hell do you have to lose?” He painted a picture of black neighborhoods as wracked with poverty, crime and schools that are “no good,” as he put it. Trump’s words were roundly criticized by many African-American leaders as insensitive and an unfair portrayal of their communities. Despite that criticism, Trump outperformed 2012 GOP nominee Mitt Romney among black voters. In his speech to Congress, the president struck a gentler, more conciliatory tone.


NPR Politics Reporter/Covers Trump

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(APPLAUSE)


Recent threats targeting Jewish community centers and vandalism of Jewish cemeteries, as well as last week's shooting in Kansas City, remind us that while we may be a nation divided on policies, we are a country that stands united in condemning hate and evil in all of its very ugly forms.


President Trump’s condemnation of “hate and evil in all its forms” with reference to the threats directed against Jewish community centers and the vandalism of Jewish cemeteries did not imply any other motive for the attacks other than hate. According to a report in BuzzFeed, Trump allegedly told state attorneys general Tuesday that “Sometimes it’s the reverse, to make people — or to make others — look bad.” Those reported comments were harshly criticized by the Anti-Defamation League and other civil rights groups, but nothing in Trump’s speech echoed those suspicions.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Religion

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This week, the Anti-Defamation League issued a nationwide security advisory after it tallied around 90 bomb threats to Jewish institutions since the start of the year. The shooting President Trump mentions occurred in Olathe, Kan.


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(APPLAUSE)

Each American generation passes the torch of truth, liberty, and justice in an unbroken chain all the way down to the president. That torch is now in our hands, and we will use it to light up the world. I am here tonight to deliver a message of unity and strength, and it is a message deeply delivered from my heart. A new chapter —

(APPLAUSE)

— of American greatness is now beginning. A new national pride is sweeping across our nation, and a new surge of optimism is placing impossible dreams firmly within our grasp. What we are witnessing today is the renewal of the American spirit. Our allies will find once that America is once again ready to lead.

(APPLAUSE)

All the nations of the world, friend or foe, will find that America is strong, America is proud, and America is free. In nine years, United States will celebrate the 250th anniversary of our founding. 250 years since the day we declared our independence. It will be one of the great milestones in the history of the world. But what will America look like as we reach our 250th year? What kind of country will we leave for our children? I will not allow the mistakes of recent decades past to define the course of our future. For too long, we have watched our middle-class shrink as we have exported our jobs and wealth to foreign countries. We financed and built one global project after another, but ignored the fates of our children.

It’s true that the U.S. middle class has been slowly shrinking. The Pew Research Center in 2015 found that the share of Americans who were “middle income” (that is, between two-thirds of the median income and double the median) fell from 61 percent in 1971 to 50 percent in 2015.

But Trump’s assertion that the U.S. is “exporting [its] jobs and wealth” is an oversimplified way of looking at trade. Trade can hurt some U.S. workers, and that pain can be intense — one major 2013 study found that “import competition explains one-quarter of the … aggregate decline in US manufacturing employment” from 1990 through 2007.

But trade also can leave Americans better off overall, as it lowers the prices of many goods and improves economic efficiency — in a 2012 survey, most top economists agreed that “in the long run these gains are much larger than any effects on employment.” And the effects on wages are not always clear. For example, the Congressional Research Service reported this year that “trade with Mexico depressed U.S. wages in some industries and states, while wages in other industries increased,” according to the U.S. International Trade Commission, but noted that other studies found “in general, NAFTA had ‘essentially no effect on real wages in the United States of either skilled or unskilled workers.’ ”


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The inner cities of Chicago, Baltimore, Detroit, and so many other places throughout our land. We’ve defended the borders of other nations while leaving our own borders wide open for anyone to cross and for drugs to pour in at a now unprecedented rate.

And we’ve spent trillions and trillions of dollars overseas while our infrastructure at home has so badly crumbled. Then in 2016, the Earth shifted beneath our feet. The rebellion started as a quiet protest, spoken by families of all colors and creeds, families who just wanted a fair shot for their children and a fair hearing for their concerns. But then, the quiet voices became a loud chorus, as thousands of citizens now spoke out together from cities small and large all across our country. Finally, the chorus became an earthquake, and the people turned out, by the tens of millions, and they were all united by one very simple but crucial demand - that America must put its own citizens first. Because only then, can we truly make America great again.

The American Society of Civil Engineers’ latest report card (in 2013) on the overall condition of the nation’s infrastructure gave the country a D+. America’s airports, roads, transit, schools, dams and drinking water and wastewater systems all got grades of D; levees, a D-. Among the few bright spots were railroads and bridges at C+. And federal investment in upgrading and repairing infrastructure has remained flat in recent years, while the highway trust fund is losing money when adjusted for inflationary costs. The group’s next report card on the state of our infrastructure is due out March 9.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Transportation

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Trump’s comment about “trillions of dollars” alludes to estimates that the total costs of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, which included significant spending on reconstruction as well as the direct costs involved with troops and combat, could add up to $4 trillion or more. Such estimates also factor in the costs involved with taking care of veterans after their deployments, which continue for decades after major combat, and the costs associated with servicing the debt used to finance the wars.

Phil Ewing

NPR National Security Editor

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This is a reference to his election. He may not be saying here that he got 306 electoral votes, as he has recently, but it was intended as a reminder to Democrats that he won. Trump got just shy of 63 million votes, but everyone who turned out to the polls certainly wasn’t “united.” Trump finished almost 3 million votes short of his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton. He has blamed that on immigrants in the country illegally voting illegally — as many as 3 million to 5 million, Trump claims. There is zero evidence of that. The Ohio secretary of state, a Republican, found that 82 noncitizens voted in at least one Ohio election and that 385 were registered to vote in 2015.


NPR Political Editor

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(APPLAUSE)

Dying industries will come roaring back to life, heroic veterans will get the care they so desperately need. Our military will be given the resources its brave warriors so richly deserve. Crumbling infrastructure will be replaced with new roads, bridges, tunnels, airports and railways, gleaming across our very very beautiful land. Our terrible drug epidemic will slow down and ultimately stop, and our neglected inner cities will see a rebirth of hope, safety, and opportunity. Above all else, we will keep our promises to the American people.

(APPLAUSE)

Thank you. It’s been a little over a month since my inauguration, and I want to take this moment to update the nation on the progress I have made in keeping those promises. Since my election, Ford, Fiat, Chrysler, General Motors, Sprint, Softbank, Lockheed, Wal Mart, and many others have announced they will invest billions and billions of dollars in the United States and will create tens of thousands of new American jobs.

The president has publicly urged many CEOs to keep production and jobs in the United States. However, most of the companies who have announced plans to create jobs and add to factories had planned to do so before Trump was elected. One notable exception was the announcement by Ford that it is canceling plans to build a factory in Mexico and will instead spend $700 million to add on to a plant in Michigan.


NPR Correspondent, Business Desk

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(APPLAUSE)

The stock market has gained almost $3 trillion in value since the election on November 8, a record. We’ve saved taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars by bringing down the price of fantastic — and it is a fantastic - new, F-35 jet fighter, and we will be saving billions more on contracts all across our government. We have placed a hiring freeze on non-military and non-essential federal workers.

Trump’s new endorsement of the F-35 will very likely come as a huge relief to the Pentagon, jet builder Lockheed Martin and the vast array of constituents around the globe of the world’s costliest weapons program. He scolded Lockheed for what he called the unreasonable cost to buy the advanced new warplanes, estimated at around $400 billion, and threatened to buy more copies of an older-model jet built by Boeing instead. Defense analysts, however, have pointed out that the price per copy for the F-35 was already falling before he took office.

Phil Ewing

NPR National Security Editor

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We have begun to drain the swamp of government corruption by imposing a five-year ban on lobbying by executive branch officials, and a lifetime ban —


(APPLAUSE)


Thank you. — and a lifetime ban on becoming lobbyists for a foreign government. We have undertaken a historic effort to massively reduce job crushing regulations, creating a deregulation task force inside of every government agency.

On Jan. 28, Trump did sign an executive order that included a lifetime ban prohibiting White House officials from lobbying for foreign governments. The order also includes a five-year ban on lobbying — but only on lobbying one’s previous agency, not all lobbying. And it is weaker than President Obama's 2009 ethics order. For example, the Obama administration’s executive order was tougher than Trump's because it blocked the hiring of people who had been registered lobbyists in the preceding year.


NPR Senior Business Editor

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(APPLAUSE)

And we are imposing a new rule which mandates that for every one new regulation, two old regulations must be eliminated.

We've yet to see any regulations rolled back through this initiative. But Congress has overturned two regulations through use of the Congressional Review Act, and earlier Tuesday, Trump signed an executive order calling for a review of another, The Waters Of The United States Act, which has been put on hold by a federal appeals court.


NPR Washington Desk Correspondent

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(APPLAUSE)

We are going to stop the regulations that threaten the future and livelihood of our great coal miners.

While the coal industry and its supporters often blame environmental regulations for the sector’s decline, that is just one of the challenges facing the business. Even more important is the competition coal faces from cheaper and cleaner-burning natural gas. Across the country power plant operators are switching from coal to gas because they can make more profit with gas-fired generators.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Energy

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(APPLAUSE)


We have cleared the way for the construction of the Keystone and Dakota Access pipelines.

(APPLAUSE)

Thereby creating tens of thousands of jobs, and I’ve issued a new directive that new American pipelines be made with American steel.

It is true construction of the Keystone XL pipeline will employ thousands of people, but only for a short time. According to a previous State Department analysis, construction will create just over 21,000 jobs during the two years construction is underway. After that it will create only 35 permanent jobs as the pipeline goes into operation.  

President Trump’s directive is a little more complicated than he says here. Trump directed Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross to develop a plan for ensuring that new pipelines are made from products manufactured in the United States. Trump gave the secretary six months to create that plan, so right now there is no requirement in place.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Energy

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(APPLAUSE)

We have withdrawn the United States from the job killing Trans-Pacific Partnership.

(APPLAUSE)

And with the help of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, we have formed a counsel with our neighbors in Canada to help ensure that women entrepreneurs have access to the networks, markets and capital they need to start a business and live out their financial dreams.

(APPLAUSE)

To protect our citizens, I have directed the Department of Justice to form a task force on reducing violent crime. I have further ordered the Departments of Homeland Security and Justice, along with the Department of State and the Director of National Intelligence, to coordinate an aggressive strategy to dismantle the criminal cartels that have spread all across our nation.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a “crime reduction and public safety task force” that includes the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the U.S. Marshals earlier Tuesday to confront what he called a “crisis.” While murders are up across several major cities, violent crime remains near record lows, according to most criminologists.


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(APPLAUSE)

We will stop the drugs from pouring into our country and poisoning our youth, and we will expand treatment for those who have become so badly addicted.

During the campaign, Trump promised to stop the flow of heroin from Mexico and help families struggling with the epidemic. At the same time, he also vowed to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. That could set up a potential tension between competing goals, given that many people addicted to opioids rely on the Medicaid expansion under Obamacare to receive treatment and overall health care. What’s more, many of the states hardest hit by the epidemic, like West Virginia, voted for Trump, and many residents are looking to the administration to improve their economic circumstances.


NPR Politics Reporter/Covers Trump

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(APPLAUSE)

At the same time, my administration has answered the pleas of the American people for immigration enforcement and border security.

(APPLAUSE)

By finally enforcing our immigration laws, we will raise wages, help the unemployed, save billions and billions of dollars, and make our communities safer for everyone.

President Trump has signed several executive orders on immigration and border security. But they were framed as matters of national security, not helping the unemployed. Many economists believe immigration is an overall plus for the economy, although it may hold down wages for workers without high school diplomas.

NPR Correspondent/Covers Immigration

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(APPLAUSE)

We want all Americans to succeed, but that can’t happen in an environment of lawless chaos. We must restore integrity and the rule of law at our borders.

(APPLAUSE)

For that reason, we will soon begin the construction of a great, great wall along our southern border.

([CHEERS])

As we speak tonight, we are removing gang members, drug dealers, and criminals that threaten our communities and prey on our very innocent citizens. Bad ones are going out, as I speak, and as I promised throughout the campaign. To any in Congress who do not believe we should enforce our laws, I would ask you this one question: What would you say to the American family that loses their jobs, their income, or their loved one because America refused to uphold its laws and defend its borders?

Trump’s executive orders, and the implementation memos released a few weeks later by the Department of Homeland Security, greatly expand which immigrants are a priority for deportation. Critics say the new policies make anyone in the country illegally a possible target, not just those who have committed a serious crime as the White House contends.  

NPR Correspondent/Covers Immigration

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(APPLAUSE)

Our obligation is to serve, protect, and defend the citizens of the United States. We are also taking strong measures to protect our nation from radical Islamic terrorism.

President Trump very slowly and emphatically used the term “radical Islamic terrorism” to describe the threat facing the nation. It is a term he used constantly during his presidential campaign. By repeating it Tuesday, he may be rebuking his own national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, who reportedly told his National Security Council staff last week that the term may not help efforts to enlist the support of Muslim allies in the fight against ISIS because ISIS terrorism is actually “un-Islamic.” Former Presidents George W. Bush and Obama shared McMaster’s view.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Religion

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(APPLAUSE)

According to data provided by the Department of Justice, the vast majority of individuals convicted of terrorism and terrorism-related offense since 9/11 came here from outside of our country. We have seen the attacks at home, from Boston to San Bernardino, to the Pentagon, and yes, even the World Trade Center. We have seen the attacks in France, in Belgium, in Germany, and all over the world. It is not compassion but reckless to allow uncontrolled entry from places where proper vetting cannot occur.

In the 16 years since Sept. 11, 94 people have been killed in the U.S. by what Trump would describe as "radical Islamic terrorism," according to a policy analyst with the International Security Program at New America, a think tank that tracks terrorist attacks in the U.S. Each of those deaths is a tragedy, but more than six times as many Americans have been killed in that time by lightning strikes. Of the 12 terrorists behind those attacks, seven were from the United States and none came from the countries targeted in Trump's original travel ban. By focusing on preventing foreign infiltration, Trump may be neglecting the challenge of domestic radicalization.  


NPR White House Correspondent

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Trump’s carefully worded reference to “individuals convicted of terrorism and terrorism-related offenses” includes scores of people ranging from attackers to sympathizers who may have lied to law enforcement officials. But it doesn’t include some of the deadliest attackers inside the U.S. since his cutoff year of 2001 — none of the Sept. 11 plotters, for example, who are still undergoing military commissions at Guantanamo — or those who were never tried because they were killed as part of their attacks. And although Trump has cited the danger of attacks by people traveling from the countries affected by his travel restrictions, all the lethal attacks by radicalized Muslims in the U.S. since 2001 have been carried out by U.S. citizens or people who were in the country lawfully.

Phil Ewing

NPR National Security Editor

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(APPLAUSE)

Those given a high honor of admission to the United States should support this country and love its people and its values. We cannot allow a beachhead of terrorism to form inside of America. We cannot allow our nation to become a sanctuary for extremists.

(APPLAUSE)

That is why my administration has been working on improved vetting procedures, and we will shortly take new steps to keep our nation safe and to keep those out who will do us harm.

Federal judges have put on hold President Trump’s executive order temporarily banning travelers from seven majority-Muslim countries, citing concerns it may violate due process rights of visitors and green card holders and could discriminate on the basis of religion. The White House is expected to unveil a new executive order, tailored to respond to the court rulings, as early as Wednesday. The ACLU and other civil rights groups say it’s not clear whether a new order will fix all of the constitutional problems they see with the plan.


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(APPLAUSE)

As promised, I directed the Department of Defense to develop a plan to demolish and destroy ISIS, a network of lawless savages that have slaughtered Muslims and Christians and men and women and children of all faiths and all beliefs. We will work with our allies, including our friends and allies in the Muslim world, to extinguish this vile enemy from our planet.

The U.S. and its partners in Iraq and Syria have been pushing back the Islamic State since former President Barack Obama launched an air campaign in 2014. In Iraq, ISIS is struggling to hold the western part of Mosul, its last urban stronghold. The group still holds a number of cities and towns in Syria but has also been losing territory and is on the defensive. Defense Secretary James Mattis on Monday presented Trump with the new plan to defeat ISIS. Details have not been released, but it is considered likely to ease some rules of engagement for the U.S. and could involve sending some additional U.S. forces on the ground, where Americans are advising Iraqi and Syrian fighters battling ISIS.


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(APPLAUSE)

I have also imposed new sanctions on entities and individuals who support Iran's ballistic missile program, and reaffirmed our unbreakable alliance with the state of Israel.

(APPLAUSE)

Finally, I have kept my promise to appoint a justice to the United States Supreme Court, from my list of 20 judges, who will defend our Constitution.

(APPLAUSE)

I am greatly honored to have Maureen Scalia with us in the gallery tonight.

(APPLAUSE)

Thank you, Maureen. Her late, great husband, Antonin Scalia, will forever be a symbol of American justice. To fill his seat, we have chosen judge Neil Gorsuch, a man of incredible skill and deep devotion to the law. He was confirmed unanimously by the court of appeals, and I am asking the Senate to swiftly approve his nomination.


Neil Gorsuch was confirmed by voice vote in the U.S. Senate in 2006 to a post on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit. The Senate Judiciary Committee has scheduled his Supreme Court confirmation hearing to begin March 20. Senate Democrats have requested more information about his record at the George W. Bush Justice Department.


NPR Justice Correspondent

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The vacancy created on the U.S. Supreme Court by the sudden death of Justice Antonin Scalia last year raised the stakes for the 45th president. After Republicans in Congress blocked former President Barack Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland, it became clear that the next president would fill that seat and any others that become vacant on the aging court in the years to come. The Supreme Court issue became a rallying cry for social conservatives and evangelical Christians, many of whom were uncomfortable with Trump’s character, history of multiple marriages, language and tone. Many conservative voters on the campaign trail said they would vote for Trump primarily with an eye toward getting a justice on the high court who would oppose abortion rights and sympathize with their concerns about religious liberty. So far, Trump appears to have delivered with his pick of Judge Neil Gorsuch, who is popular with abortion-rights opponents and other conservatives.


NPR Politics Reporter/Covers Trump

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(APPLAUSE)

Tonight, as I outlined the next steps we must take as a country, we must honestly acknowledge the circumstances we inherited. 94 million Americans are out of the labor force. Over 43 million people are now living in poverty, and over 43 million Americans are on food stamps.

Trump is right that around 94 million Americans are out of the labor force — that is, they are not working and not looking for work. But that’s not necessarily bad. For example, a college student, a retiree, and a stay-at-home parent could all be quite happily out of the labor force.

It’s true that the labor force participation rate (the share of working-age adults who are working or looking for work) fell off steadily during and after the Great Recession and that its current level, 62.9 percent, is low compared with its levels in the late 1990s and early 2000s. However, only part of that may be due to lingering problems in the job market. As baby boomers increasingly retire, that will also continue to pull the participation rate down and drive that 94 million figure upward. A recent analysis from the Congressional Budget Office found that this is the “most important factor driving down the overall participation rate.”


NPR Politics Reporter

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More than one in five people in their prime working years are not working. We have the worst financial recovery and 65 years. In the last eight years, the past administration has put on more new debt than nearly all of the other presidents combined.

We have lost more than one fourth of our manufacturing jobs since NAFTA was approved, and we have lost 60,000 factories since China joined the World Trade Organization in 2001.

Our trade deficit in the goods with the world last year was nearly $800 billion, and overseas, we have inherited a serious tragic foreign policy disasters. Solving these and so many other pressing problems require us to work asked the differences of party. It will require us to tap into the American spirit that has overcome every challenge throughout our long and storied history. But to accomplish our goals at home and abroad, we must restart the engine of the American economy, making it easy to do business in the United States, and much much harder for companies to leave our country.

(APPLAUSE)

Right now, American companies are taxed at one of the highest rates anywhere in the world. My economic team is developing historic tax reform that will reduce the tax rate on our companies so they can compete and thrive anywhere and with anyone.


(APPLAUSE)


It will be a big, big cut. At the same time we will provide massive tax relief for the middle class. We must create a level playing field for American companies and our workers. Have to do it. 

During the presidential campaign, then-candidate Trump proposed a massive tax cut for both  individuals and companies. He called for tax cuts across the income spectrum, but the biggest benefits would have gone to the well-off. And Trump called for a huge cut in the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 15 percent. President Trump has promised a more detailed tax proposal to be unveiled in early to mid-March. But Republican tax writers in the House have gotten a big head start. The House plan would be a historic overhaul of corporate taxation. The problem is that the White House has big misgivings about one important element: something called the border adjustment tax, or BAT. It would impose a 20 percent tax on all imports and exempt U.S. exports from tax. Not surprisingly, that has divided the U.S. business community. For instance, big retailers who import much of what they sell hate it. But big exporters like it. Many conservative lawmakers like it because it would raise about $1 trillion over 10 years, which would help offset revenue losses from lower tax rates for businesses and individuals. A number of Republican senators also oppose the BAT. If Trump’s tax-writing team can produce an attractive compromise, it could help Republicans avoid a nasty intraparty tax cut fight.


NPR Correspondent, Business Desk

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(APPLAUSE)

Currently when we ship products out of America, many other countries make us pay very high tariffs and taxes. But when foreign companies ship their products into America, we charge them nothing or almost nothing. I just met with officials and workers from a great American company, Harley Davidson. In fact, they proudly displayed five of their magnificent motorcycles, made in the U.S.A., on the front lawn of the White House.

([LAUGHTER])

(APPLAUSE)

And they wanted me to ride one, and I said, no thank you.

([LAUGHTER])

At our meeting, I asked them, how are you doing, how is business? They said it is good. I asked them further, how they are doing with other countries, mainly with international sales. They told me, without complaining, because they have been so mistreated for so long that they have become used to it, that it is very hard to do business with other countries because they tax our goods at such a high rate. They said that in the case of another country, they tax their motorcycles at 100%. They weren't even asking for a change but I am. I believe —

(APPLAUSE)

I believe strongly in free trade, but it also has to be fair trade. It has been a long time since we had fair trade. The first Republican president, Abraham Lincoln, warned that the “abandonment of the protective policy by the American government will produce want and ruin among our people." Lincoln was right, and it is time we heeded his advice and his words.

Trying to compare trade today with trade in the Lincoln era is an apples-to-oranges comparison in many ways. For one, the U.S. economy in the late 1800s was developing. That’s clearly not the case today, as the Brookings Institution’s Gary Burtless told NPR in June 2016, after Trump had made a similar comparison.

“The protectionist argument got some support from the notion that the U.S. had infant industries that would be quashed by the scale and power of the Europeans,” he said. “Of course, the infant industry argument is not attractive to the United States today, when we have the largest and most advanced economy.”

In addition, he added, “Trump ignores all the benefits to U.S. consumers for whom global competition had created better and cheaper products.”

Likewise, when the Washington Post’s Robert Gebelhoff did his own deep dive into the Lincoln trade comparison in June, he pointed out that trade policy today is tightly tied to global politics.

“How the United States and China interact with each other depends on how we trade with each other — and Lincoln certainly never had to face such pressure during his presidential tenure,” Gebelhoff wrote.


NPR Politics Reporter

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(APPLAUSE)

I am not going to let America and its great companies and workers be taken advantage of anymore. They have taken advantage of our country. No longer.

(APPLAUSE)

I am going to bring back millions of jobs. Protecting our workers also means reforming our system of legal immigration.

(APPLAUSE)

The current, outdated system depresses wages for our poorest workers and puts great pressure on taxpayers. Nations around the world, like Canada, Australia, and many others have a merit-based, immigration system.

(APPLAUSE)

It is a basic principle that those seeking to enter a country ought to be able to support themselves financially. Yet, in America, we do not enforce this rule, straining the very public resources that our poorest citizens rely upon.

According to the National Academy of Sciences, our current immigration system costs American taxpayers many billions of dollars a year. Switching away from this current system of lower-skilled immigration, and instead adopting a merit-based system, we will have so many more benefits. It will save countless dollars, raise workers' wages, and help struggling families, including immigrant families, enter the middle class. And they will do it quickly and they will be very, very happy indeed.

Trump appears to be referring to this study published last year by the National Academy of Sciences. It found that “the impact of immigration on the wages of native-born workers overall is very small.” The study also found that first-generation immigrants are more costly to state and local governments. But the children of immigrants, on the other hand, are among the “strongest economic and fiscal contributors in the U.S. population, contributing more in taxes than either their parents or the rest of the native-born population.”

NPR Correspondent/Covers Immigration

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I believe that real and positive immigration reform is possible, as long as we focus on the following goals: To improve jobs and wages for Americans, to strengthen our nation's security, and to restore respect for our laws. If we are guided by the well-being of American citizens, then I believe Republicans and Democrats can work together to achieve an outcome that has eluded our country for decades.

This is a sharp turn from Trump’s rhetoric on immigration in the first weeks of his presidency.

He has floated the idea of reform before. But as president, he has focused on tougher enforcement of existing immigration laws, cracking down on sanctuary cities, and building a wall on the border with Mexico. Trump even invited several family members of people who were killed by immigrants in the country illegally to attend Tuesday’s speech.

NPR Correspondent/Covers Immigration

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Another Republican president, Dwight D. Eisenhower, initiated the last truly great national infrastructure program, the building of the interstate highway system. The time has come for a new program of national rebuilding.

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America has spent approximately $6 trillion in the Middle East. All the while our infrastructure at home has crumbled. With this $6 trillion, we could have rebuilt our country twice, and maybe even three times, if we had people who had the ability to negotiate.

The American Society of Civil Engineers estimated in 2013 that the nation would need to spend $3.6 trillion by 2020 to put our airports, roads, bridges, dams, levees, wastewater, drinking water and other infrastructure into a state of good repair. That cost estimate has almost certainly increased since then.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Transportation

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To launch our national rebuilding, I will be asking the Congress to approve legislation that produces a $1 trillion investment in infrastructure of the United States financed through both, public and private capital, creating millions of new jobs.

This is the first time the president has suggested public financing will be needed in addition to private investment to fix and rebuild the nation’s infrastructure, but it is still unclear where that money will come from. There is significant opposition within Trump’s own party in Congress to raising gasoline and diesel taxes, and there is some opposition in his own party to increasing tolling on the nation’s highways, bridges and other infrastructure — a key way to leverage private funding for infrastructure.

If Congress approves spending $1 trillion on the nation’s infrastructure, that would be a much bigger investment than what lawmakers approved to address the Great Recession in the early days of the Obama administration. The 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act spent $787 billion in a much broader way — including tax cuts and tax credits, and aid to state governments and school districts to shore up their budgets and prevent layoffs — in addition to investments in public infrastructure, including what President Obama called “shovel ready” projects.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Transportation

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This effort will be guided by two core principles: Buy American and hire American.

President Trump and his administration have not yet explained exactly what “buy American” will mean when it comes to rebuilding the nation’s infrastructure. There already are “buy America” requirements in federal law for materials used in federally funded transportation construction projects, especially for U.S.-made steel. Expanding such requirements could significantly increase the costs of rebuilding infrastructure, as we reported Monday.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Transportation

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Tonight I am also calling on this Congress to repeal and replace Obamacare —


(APPLAUSE)


— with reforms that expand choice, increase access, lower costs, and at the same time, provide better healthcare.

Republicans in Congress took the first steps to repeal Obamacare in January. However, they’ve had trouble coming up with a replacement plan they can agree on. House Speaker Paul Ryan released an outline of the working Republican plan last week, but almost immediately some House Republicans said they would oppose the plan. And an analysis of the plan by McKinsey and Avalere Health presented to the National Governors Association last week showed that it could lead to millions of people losing their health care coverage.


NPR Health Policy Correspondent

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Mandating every American to buy government-approved health insurance was never the right solution for our country.

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The way to make health insurance available to everyone is to lower the cost of health insurance, and that is what we are going to do.

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Obamacare premiums nationwide have increased by double and triple digits. As an example, Arizona went up 116% last year alone. Governor Matt Bevin of Kentucky just said Obamacare is failing in his state. The state of Kentucky, and it is unsustainable and collapsing.

Individual insurance premiums have increased an average 22 percent across the U.S. But it’s important to note that under the Affordable Care Act, subsidies to purchase insurance rise as premiums go up, so most people’s out-of-pocket premium costs don’t rise.


NPR Health Policy Correspondent

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One third of counties have only one insurer, and they are losing them fast. They are losing them so fast, they are leaving, and many Americans have no choice at all. There is no choice left. Remember, when you were told that you could keep your doctor and keep your plan? We now know that all of those promises have been totally broken. Obamacare is collapsing, and we must act decisively to protect all Americans.

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Action is not a choice. It is a necessity. So I am calling on all Democrats and Republicans in Congress to work with us to save Americans from this imploding Obamacare disaster.

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Here are the principles that should guide Congress as we move to create a better healthcare system for all Americans. First, we should ensure that Americans with pre-existing conditions have access to coverage, and that we have a stable transition for Americans currently enrolled in the health care exchanges.

The Affordable Care Act requires insurance companies to offer insurance to people with existing medical conditions at the same price as to others in the same area and the same age. President Trump and congressional Republicans have said they want to ensure those same protections are in their replacement plan. House Speaker Paul Ryan’s plan as of now would bar insurers from discriminating against people with pre-existing conditions as long as they kept their insurance without interruption. However, if they let their insurance lapse, then they could be charged a penalty to re-enroll and could be charged more.


NPR Health Policy Correspondent

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Secondly, we should help Americans purchase their own coverage, through the use of tax credits and expanded health savings accounts, but it must be the plan they want, not the plan forced on them by our government.

The Republican proposal to replace Obamacare includes tax credits to help people buy insurance on the open market. However, those credits aren’t as generous as the subsidies in the Affordable Care Act and would very likely result in many low-income people not being able to afford comprehensive insurance.


NPR Health Policy Correspondent

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Thirdly, we should give our state governors the resources and flexibility they need with Medicaid to make sure no one is left out.

The House Republican proposal to replace Obamacare would roll back the law’s expansion of Medicaid. It would also turn the health program for the poor and people with disabilities largely over to the states, either as a fixed block grant or by giving the states a per capita sum. One analysis of the proposal found that the plan would save money but many people would lose coverage.


NPR Health Policy Correspondent

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Fourth, we should implement legal reforms that protect patients and doctors from unnecessary costs that drive up the price of insurance and work to bring down the artificially high price of drugs and bring them down immediately.

The House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday approved a bill that would limit punitive damages in medical malpractice cases to $250,000. Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte says the change could cut premiums for medical malpractice insurance by 25 percent.


NPR Health Policy Correspondent

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And finally, the time has come to give Americans the freedom to purchase health insurance across state lines.


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Which will create a truly competitive national marketplace that will bring cost way down and provide far better care. So important. Everything that is broken in our country can be fixed. Every problem can be solved. And every hurting family can find healing and hope. Our citizens deserve this and so much more. So why not join forces and finally get the job done and get it done right?

Individual insurance coverage is regulated by states, not the federal government, so insurers have to have their plans approved state by state. However, the Affordable Care Act permits states to join together to sell insurance across state lines, and at least three states now allow some form of cross-border sales of health insurance. So far, however, no insurers have shown interest in selling Obamacare plans across state lines. Many analysts say that some consumers might see some savings but could also end up with fewer protections — and fewer guaranteed benefits — than they have in their own state. Selling/buying insurance across state lines is mostly a theory, so far not proved to work.



NPR Health Policy Correspondent

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On this and so many other things, Democrats and Republicans should get together and unite for the good of our country and for the good of the American people.


(APPLAUSE)


My administration wants to work with members of both parties to make child care accessible and affordable, to help ensure new parents — that they have paid family leave.


(APPLAUSE)


To invest in women's health, and to promote clean air and clean water, and to rebuild our military and our infrastructure.

On the most controversial reproductive health issue — abortion — Trump’s position throughout the campaign was clear: He opposed abortion rights and, as the GOP nominee, promised to appoint Supreme Court justices who shared that position. One of his first acts as president banned federal funding for organizations overseas that “promote” abortion. Nonetheless, Trump has talked about improving health care for female veterans, a theme in keeping with his overall emphasis on veterans issues.



NPR Politics Reporter/Covers Trump

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(APPLAUSE)

True love for our people requires us to find common ground, to advance the common good and to cooperate on behalf of every American child who deserves a much brighter future. An incredible young woman is with us this evening, who should serve as an inspiration to us all. Today is Rare Disease Day, and joining us in the gallery is a rare disease survivor, Megan Crowley. Megan —

(APPLAUSE)

Megan was diagnosed with Pompe disease, a rare and serious illness, when she was 15 months old. She was not expected to live past five. On receiving this news, Megan's dad, John, fought with everything he had to save the life of his precious child. He founded a company to look for a cure and helped develop the drug that saved Megan's life. Today she is 20 years old and a sophomore at Notre Dame.

(APPLAUSE)

Megan's story is about the unbounded power of a father's love for a daughter. But our slow and burdensome approval process at the food and drug administration keeps too many advances, like the one that saved megan's life, from reaching those in need. If we slash the restraints, not just at the fda, but across our government, then we will be blessed with far more miracles just like megan.

(APPLAUSE)

In fact, our children will grow up in a nation of miracles. But to achieve this future, we must enrich the mind, and the souls, of every American child. Education is the civil rights issue of our time.

Trump was echoing at least two of his predecessors in this line. Obama’s White House called education the “civil rights issue of our time” on its website, and Obama himself said so in a 2011 speech. Likewise, George W. Bush said so in 2002.


NPR Politics Reporter

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I am calling upon members of both parties to pass an education bill that funds school choice for disadvantaged youth, including millions of african-american and latino children. These families should —

(APPLAUSE)


These families should be free to choose the public, private, charter, magnet, religious or home school that is right for them.

President Trump’s support for religious schooling was the one and only reference he made to religious rights in his entire speech. This may disappoint some conservative Christians who wanted Trump to announce his support for legislation or an executive order that would protect people who say their religious beliefs do not allow them to accommodate same-sex marriage or transgender people. That religious freedom cause did not get advanced in this speech.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Religion

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(APPLAUSE)

Joining us tonight in the gallery is a remarkable woman, Denisha Merriweather. As a young girl, Denisha struggled in school and failed third grade twice. But then she was able to enroll in a private center for learning, great learning center, with the help of a tax credit, and a scholarship program. Today, she is the first in her family to graduate, not just from high school, but from college. Later this year, she will get her master’s degree in social work. We want all children to be able to break the cycle of poverty just like Denisha.

(APPLAUSE)

But to break the cycle of poverty, we must also break the cycle of violence.

The murder rate in 2015 experienced its largest single-year increase in nearly half a century. In Chicago, more than 4,000 people were shot last year alone –- and the murder rate so far this year has been even higher. This is not acceptable in our society.

Already in the first two months of this year, more than 100 people have been murdered in Chicago, according to counts by the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times and other media outlets. The city is, in fact, ahead of last year’s murder rate. The number of homicides last year totaled more than 750; the last time the city hit more than 700 homicides was in 1998.


NPR National Desk Correspondent/Covers Transportation

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(APPLAUSE)

In 2016, more than 4,300 people were the victims of shootings in Chicago and the city suffered 762 homicides. Violence continues there in 2017. While murders are on the rise across several American cities, the Brennan Center for Justice reported “violent crime still remains near the bottom of the nation’s 30-year downward trend.”


NPR Justice Correspondent

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Every American child should be able to grow up in a safe community, to attend a great school, and to have access to a high-paying job.

(APPLAUSE)

But to create this future, we must work with –- not against, not against -– the men and women of law enforcement.

(APPLAUSE)


We must build bridges of cooperation and trust –- not drive the wedge of disunity and –- really what it is, division. It’s pure, unadulterated division. We have to unify.

Police and sheriffs are members of our community.  They are friends and neighbors, they are mothers and fathers, sons and daughters – and they leave behind loved ones every day who worry whether or not they'll come home safe and sound.

We must support the incredible men and women of law enforcement. 

(APPLAUSE)

And we must support the victims of crime.

The Fraternal Order of Police, the country’s largest police union, endorsed Donald Trump during the presidential campaign. Trump has made restoring partnerships with law enforcement a priority and has already met with police and sheriffs groups. Civil rights groups and veterans of the Obama Justice Department worry that the Trump administration will back away from its strategy of conducting federal investigations into discrimination and excessive force by police departments. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said earlier Tuesday that state and local authorities are responsible for some 85 percent of policing across the U.S. Sessions also reported he has yet to decide whether to negotiate a court-enforceable consent decree with Chicago police over problems there or to abandon that Obama-era effort altogether.


NPR Justice Correspondent

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I have ordered the Department of Homeland Security to create an office to serve American Victims.  The office is called VOICE –- Victims Of Immigration Crime Engagement.  We are providing a voice to those who have been ignored by our media, and silenced by special interests.

(APPLAUSE)

Joining us in the audience tonight are four very brave Americans whose government failed them. Their names are Jamiel Shaw, Susan Oliver, Jenna Oliver, and Jessica Davis.

Jamiel's 17-year-old son was viciously murdered by an illegal immigrant gang member, who had just been released from prison.  Jamiel Shaw Jr. was an incredible young man, with unlimited potential who was getting ready to go to college where he would have excelled as a great college quarterback.  But he never got the chance.  His father, who is in the audience tonight, has become a good friend of mine. Jamiel, thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

Also with us are Susan Oliver and Jessica Davis.  Their husbands –- Deputy Sheriff Danny Oliver and Detective Michael Davis –- were slain in the line of duty in California.  They were pillars of their community.  These brave men were viciously gunned down by an illegal immigrant with a criminal record and two prior deportations should have never been in our country.

Sitting with Susan is her daughter, Jenna.  Jenna:  I want you to know that your father was a hero, and that tonight you have the love of an entire country supporting you and praying for you.

(APPLAUSE)

To Jamiel, Jenna, Susan and Jessica:  I want you to know –- we will never stop fighting for justice.  Your loved ones will never, ever be forgotten, we will always honor their memory.

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Finally, to keep America safe we must provide the men and women of the United States military with the tools they need to prevent war –- if they must –- they have to fight, and they only have to win.

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I am sending the Congress a budget that rebuilds the military, eliminates the defense sequester, and calls for one of the largest increases in national defense spending in American history.

My budget will also increase funding for our veterans. Our veterans have delivered for this nation –- and now we must deliver for them.

(APPLAUSE)

The challenges we face as a nation are great.  But our people are even greater. And none are greater or braver than those who fight for America in uniform.


We are blessed to be joined tonight by Carryn Owens, the widow of a U.S. Navy Special Operator, Senior Chief William "Ryan" Owens.  Ryan died as he lived:  a warrior, and a hero –- battling against terrorism and securing our nation.

(APPLAUSE)

What followed was clearly a powerful moment in the speech, referencing Owen’s death in a raid in Yemen. But though Owens’ widow was there, it was notable who wasn’t — Owens’ parents. This week, Owens’ father called for an investigation and refused to meet with Trump when the president met his son’s body at Dover Air Force Base. “I told them I didn’t want to make a scene about it, but my conscience wouldn’t let me talk to him,” Owens’ father, Bill, a veteran who said he did not vote for Trump, told the Miami Herald. Irritated with the White House’s using his son’s death as cover against those who criticize the raid, Bill Owens said, “Don’t hide behind my son’s death to prevent an investigation. I want an investigation. … The government owes my son an investigation.”


NPR Political Editor

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I just spoke to our great General Mattis, just now, who reconfirmed that, and I quote, "Ryan was a part of a highly successful raid that generated large amounts of vital intelligence that will lead to many more victories in the future against our enemies."  Ryan's legacy is etched into eternity. Thank you. Thank you.


Other Pentagon officials have a slightly different view of the information, saying the intelligence gathered was not “actionable,” meaning it can’t be used right away for other military operations. Still, they say the gathered information provides an insight in al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula’s activities and operations and could be used for future operations.


And while the president referred to the “great Gen. Mattis” in his address to Congress, earlier in the day on 


Fox & Friends, Trump placed the blame for Ryan’s death on the military hierarchy. “This was something they wanted to do,” he said, adding, “and they lost Ryan.”


NPR Pentagon Reporter

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And Ryan is looking down right now, you know that, and he’s very happy because I think he just broke a record.  For as the Bible teaches us, there is no greater act of love than to lay down one's life for one's friends.  Ryan laid down his life for his friends, for his country, and for our freedom –- and we will never forget Ryan.

(APPLAUSE)

This is nearly a direct quote from the Bible, from the words of Jesus in the New Testament Book of John.


NPR Politics Reporter/Covers Trump

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To those allies who wonder what kind of friend America will be, look no further than the heroes who wear our uniform.

Our foreign policy calls for a direct, robust and meaningful engagement with the world.  It is American leadership based on vital security interests that we share with our allies all across the globe.

We strongly support NATO, an alliance forged through the bonds of two World Wars that dethroned fascism.

(APPLAUSE)

 And a Cold War that defeated communism.

(APPLAUSE)


But our partners must meet their financial obligations.


And now, based on our very strong and frank discussions, they are beginning to do just that. In fact I can tell you, the money is pouring in. Very nice.


(APPLAUSE)


Trump alludes to tough talk during the presidential campaign and since about what he characterized as freeloading nations mooching off American power. In some cases, it was incorrect — South Korea and Japan, which he criticized, contribute billions of dollars to help host the tens of thousands of American troops deployed there. In other cases he amplified a long-standing complaint by Pentagon leaders that only a few members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization spend at least 2 percent of their national budgets on defense, as NATO’s founding charter requires. Most of the 28 members of NATO spend less, and notwithstanding post-inauguration overtures by Trump and his top lieutenants, there has been no indication that France, Germany, Italy or other powers have committed to major new spikes. And these kinds of relationships don’t involve payments to the United States but rather how much countries spend in their own defense budgets, so there is no “money pouring in.”

Phil Ewing

NPR National Security Editor

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We expect our partners, whether in NATO, in the Middle East, or the Pacific –- to take a direct and meaningful role in both strategic and military operations, and pay their fair share of the cost –- have to do that.

We will respect historic institutions, but we will respect the foreign rights of all nations. And they have to respect our rights as a nation, also.

(APPLAUSE)

Free nations are the best vehicle for expressing the will of the people –- and America respects the right of all nations to chart their own path. My job is not to represent the world. My job is to represent the United States of America.

This is a good summary of the zero-sum form of nationalism espoused by Trump and his senior strategist, Steve Bannon. Of course, previous presidents also saw their job as representing the United States of America. But for decades before Trump, both Democratic and Republican leaders saw enlightened self-interest in the promotion of an international order.


NPR White House Correspondent

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But we know that America is better off, when there is less conflict -- not more.

We must learn from the mistakes of the past –- we have seen the war and the destruction that have ravaged and raged throughout the world, all across the world.

The only long-term solution for these humanitarian disasters, in many cases, is to create the conditions where displaced persons can safely return home and begin the long, long process of rebuilding.

(APPLAUSE)

America is willing to find new friends, and to forge new partnerships, where shared interests align.  We want harmony and stability, not war and conflict.


We want peace, wherever peace can be found.  America is friends today with former enemies.  Some of our closest allies, decades ago, fought on the opposite side of these terrible, terrible wars.  This history should give us all faith in the possibilities for a better world.

Hopefully, the 250th year for America will see a world that is more peaceful, more just and more free.

On our 100th anniversary, in 1876, citizens from across our Nation came to Philadelphia to celebrate America's centennial.  At that celebration, the country's builders and artists and inventors showed off their wonderful creations.

Alexander Graham Bell displayed his telephone for the first time.

Remington unveiled the first typewriter.  An early attempt was made at electric light.

Thomas Edison showed an automatic telegraph and an electric pen. Imagine the wonders our country could know in America's 250th year.

(APPLAUSE)

Think of the marvels we can achieve if we simply set free the dreams of our people. Cures to the illnesses that have always plagued us are not too much to hope. American footprints on distant worlds are not too big a dream. Millions lifted from welfare to work is not too much to expect.

And streets where mothers are safe from fear -- schools where children learn in peace -- and jobs where Americans prosper and grow -- are not too much to ask

(APPLAUSE)

When we have all of this, we will have made America greater than ever before. For all Americans.

This is our vision. This is our mission. But we can only get there together. We are one people, with one destiny. We all bleed the same blood. We all salute the same, great American flag. And we are all made by the same God.


(APPLAUSE)

This line is very reminiscent of a somewhat controversial phrase from Trump’s campaign speech, in which he cast a vision of the United States as “one people, under one God, saluting one American flag,” a line he repeated many times. Some critics said that language was exclusive of Americans who do not believe in God and implied that all Americans should worship the same God. The phrasing in the speech to Congress follows a similar rhythm and imagery, but is a bit different. Trump talked about all people being made by God — a belief that of course many Americans do not share, but a line that does not seem to imply so strongly a common religion for all Americans.


NPR Politics Reporter/Covers Trump

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 When we fulfill this vision; when we celebrate our 250 years of glorious freedom, we will look back on tonight as when this new chapter of American greatness began. The time for small thinking is over. The time for trivial fights is behind us. We just need the courage to share the dreams that fill our hearts. The bravery to express the hopes that stir our souls. And the confidence to turn those hopes and those dreams into action.

From now on, America will be empowered by our aspirations, not burdened by our fears –- inspired by the future, not bound by the failures of the past –- and guided by our vision, not blinded by our doubts. I am asking all citizens to embrace this renewal of the American spirit.  I am asking all members of Congress to join me in dreaming big, and bold and daring things for our country. I am asking everyone watching tonight to seize this moment.

Believe in yourselves. Believe in your future. And believe, once more, in America. Thank you, God bless you, and God Bless these United States.

(APPLAUSE)

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